Private: Blog: Connecting Youth to their Strengths, Work, and Emotional Adaptations

FREE DOWNLOAD-POSTER with CHECKLIST [Student Coping]

 

Hello teachers, parents, and advocates,

Parents and teachers are heroes doing their best to provide youth of all ages online schooling. However, this can be especially difficult when we see the emotional losses a student shows. We validate a young person’s sadness as they miss peers at school, lost of important events such as, graduation, or postponed enrichment activities, i.e., music lessons or athletic sports.

No child and their family should have to live through the COVID-19 pandemic. It isn’t fair.  COVID-19 is with us and we must face it.

Yet, what if we look at the COVID-19 situation through the lens of an opportunity. I know this sounds impossible, but please hear me out. Youth can use this time to get to know themselves better, learn new things at their own pace, explore exciting topics with curiosity and creativity. They can learn to give themselves permission to initiate self-care and to do their best. The goal is to increase their focus and attention on tasks or interests while decreasing anxiety and worry.

Even as we create opportunities for youth at home, we will have set backs and fail many times over. Unfortunately, there isn’t a model for widespread nontraditional teaching. To move through it, we must believe there is a light at the end of the tunnel and we must believe we will all come out better when COVID-19 crises is resolved.

I have an adult son with autism who has made much progress throughout the years to take part in the community, have employment, and live in his own house with supports. Currently, most of his daily and weekly routines with support persons are on hold for now, which has thrown him off balance. Yet,  I am grateful he has his art. Painting in his studio is a life-saver for him. I don’t know what he would do without it. It grounds him and gives him something to look forward to these days.

My hope is that many years from now our children will share with their children and grandchildren how they survived the global COVID-19 pandemic. What will youth say to their  grandchildren when they are asked what it was like to live in the global pandemic? I don’t know of course, but I think they will remember the strengths they drew upon to persevere.

When I think about the beginning of each day, I start it with: “What positive memories can I create for my work, my family and myself?” Focusing on just one day at a time, I believe we will get through this with perseverance. And perhaps the young generation will be the heroes ready to serve brilliantly in our future world.

I created a  POSTER WITH A STUDENT CHECKLIST (6 pages) to use in Distance Learning or at home with youth or the young adult.

DOWNLOAD FREE- POSTER AND CHECKLIST

Product Description:

FREE POSTER AND FREE CHECKLIST: 16 Ways to Cope, Learn, and Create your Day. This poster and checklist is designed to give youth a ‘perspective’ ‘next step supports’ and ‘self-empowerment’ to find their ‘voice’ and ‘choice’ over what they can do to cope, manage, and grow.

DOWNLOAD FREE- POSTER AND CHECKLIST

To see additional resources for Distance Learning, go to:

‘Youth Rescue’ Teachers Pay Teachers’ Store

To Be Notified of New Promotions or Releases

Jackie’s website

I love creating tools to invite youth to experience:

*self-awareness to help direct their decisions, emotionally cope, and socially adapt.

*self-value to know they matter greatly.

*self-advocacy to express their voice and choice about what they need, what they enjoy, and who they want to become.

Thank you for reading my blog

LINKED IN

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

After decades of teaching youth with disabilities in all grades and researching what youth with autism spectrum need to make better work adaptations, Dr. Jackie Marquette discovered what youth need to acquire employment. It is as simple as a two sided coin. One side is for employers to acknowledge a candidate’s skills, strengths, and support needs, and the other side of the coin involves preparing youth to see their skills and interests from a wide range of strengths, personalized supports, and gainful social emotional awareness. Jackie has an adult son with autism and she has walked the walk, with ups and downs, failures and successes. Trent had employment at Meijer, a retail store for 13 years with innovative supports and for 19 years Trent has created abstract paintings for his art business. Many youth fall short in getting employed or getting in the right workplace environment. Rather, it is the personally matched opportunities and experiences with personal/social awareness preparation that enables adaptation and self-advocacy. With high youth unemployment, we all suffer. Very few educators, counselors, and employment professionals understand why or how to prevent the high youth unemployment rate.

 

Dr. Jackie Marquette writes curriculum for student career preparation as it relates to skill development and social emotional learning. She is the founder of the Transition Career Academy teaching online courses and face-to-face workshops. Her trainings are approved for 6 CE’s by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC). She has been endorsed by highly recognized colleagues in the disability field for skills in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Training, and Research. Her extensive experiences span teaching students with learning/developmental disabilities and ‘at risk’, spearheading autism community workplace projects, implementing school district transition programs, consulting and using her own tools, one-to-one with youth seeking employment through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. She researched and interviewed over 800 youth with autism and their advocates, professionals, family members. As the owner of Youth Rescue© DBA Marquette Index, LLC, her program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders, employers, and youth with their advocates. The purpose is to enhance everyone’s performance to make a meaningful difference in schools, companies, and the lives of all youth including those on who struggle socially and emotionally.

 

[COVID-19] 18 IDEAS TO HELP YOUTH CHANGE WHAT THEY CAN | Social Emotional Learning | Dr. Jackie M. Marquette

“I’m bored.” “I want to see my friends.”“How much longer is this virus going to last?”

These are some of the comments I hear from my friends who have teenagers at home. Some kids young and older are taking it hard as they are isolated from their peers.

Other teens and young adults face the COVID-19 crises with multiple challenges, such as, worried about an elderly family member who contracted COVID-19, parents working at home, or a parent’s job loss. Parents struggle to keep young children and/or young adults (on the autism spectrum or with disabilities) active and engaged at home. Families have never confronted challenging times like these.

I believe we can all get through this pandemic together and become more resilient and prepared to seek new experiences and live life to its fullest when the virus diminishes.

There is a quote that has helped me learn, practice, and support my adult son with autism. “Our strength grows out of our weakness.” by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

 18 ideas parents and teachers: Helping youth find strength during COVID-19 adversity.

1. Let youth know that even with a weakness or a challenge such as, living with adversity during difficult times, they can get through it all and get stronger. Yes it isn’t fair. But it is this generation’s call to duty. We all have to do it because it is our time. We know powerful real life stories of people from the past overcoming challenges or adversities. And we can overcome this as well.

2. Help the teen or young adult see that it is OKAY to have weaknesses. What’s more, help the teen or young adult accept their weaknesses such as, having a learning disability. Show our youth who have disabilities that many have become artists, entertainers, and mathematicians. We all have weaknesses and with them we can gain strength.

3. Help teens leverage a weakness. For example, a disorganization weakness can limit a student in starting or completing class assignments. Yet a student can recognize how to improve upon a weakness by putting into place a creative routine for online schoolingsuccess.

4. Encourage teens to find relief and comfort by seeking out teachers and parents to listen to their concerns or worries.

5. Recognize and validate to a young person the worries and anxiety they feel.

6. Help youth see and name small daily acts of courage that shape coping or help getting them get through one day at a time. For example, something as simple as getting away from the TV and doing self-care by walking their Golden Retriever for a daily walk around the neighborhood is an act of courage.

7. Help youth see how important it is to give themselves permission to initiate various ways of self-care such as, spending some needed time in a room away from family members, resting while listening to music, exercising, eating healthy snacks, all of which are actions of self-compassion.

8. Encourage youth to connect and keep in touch with others via electronic devices: grandparents, family members, and friends.

9. Encourage youth to create a visual routine of activities. Help them see that the routine can give meaning to their day which can also ground their day or week like a boat anchor.

10. Suggest that a teen might create a personalized artsy or crafty checklist of their routine. When youth create through drawings, pictures, a diagram, or a video, it can be fun.

11. Encourage youth to create daily or weekly goals. Suggest that h-she start with this question: “What would I have to have in place to feel better, to start, and stay with my (fill the goal in this blank).

12. Let youth know that during highly stressed times, it is OKAY to initiate just a few tasks. This is HUGE because this may be the best that the teen can do in one day, given the emotional stress h-she is feeling.

13. Teach teens to not be hard on themselves and to accept h-her weaknesses and adversity. Accepting is the first step in getting through. Help youth see what they are going through isn’t their fault and most importantly, isn’t permanent. The teen or young adult can be part of changing their daily life on their way to the new normal part of life in the future.

14. Help youth become more aware of the things they focus their attention upon and the emotions that unfold from that attention. For example: the act of worry and anxiety brings low energy which may result in listless activity, such as, staying in bed most of the day. In contrast, the teen can initiate the act of bike riding or skateboarding which delivers good feelings and increased energy from being in the sunshine and open air.

15. Help youth see the value of their goodness to other people when they focus their attention on (some examples): playing a board game with family (leisure), unloading the dishwasher (helping out the family), chatting with friends about collaborative online assignments, or just sitting on a porch swing to practice deep breathing (mindfulness).

16. Do express to the teen when you notice simple actions of h-her contribution, however so small in: self-care, planning, contributing to others, or completing tasks. This will reflect back that h-her efforts are working on their own behalf.

17. Support youth to self-advocate and to choose a person they trust to voice a need or concern.

18. Most importantly, you the parent/teacher do these things to emotionally balance yourself, walk the walk, talk the talk to what you teach. You are an example to the teen or young adult.

I believe youth can get through this difficult time, become resilient, and become more prepared to live life to its fullest.

End note: These suggestions can be adapted to all, young children and teensand young adults with Autism Spectrum and disabilities.

[Distance Learning] If you could give students entertaining and engaging activities to learn more about themselves in order to make emotional adaptations, wouldn’t you want them to have the resources? There are numerous resources on:

Jackie’s Store on Teacher Pay Teachers

Made for Google Drive, Google Slides

CCSSCCA.R.1

PDF CCSSCCA.R.1

For more resources students will enjoy learning at home.

Jackie’s Store on Teacher Pay Teachers

To Be Notified of New Promotions or Releases

Jackie’s website

I love creating tools to invite youth to experience:

*self-awareness to help direct their decisions, emotionally cope, and socially adapt.

*self-value to know they matter greatly.

*self-advocacy to express their voice and choice about what they need, what they enjoy, and who they want to become.

What Gets Between Youth and Their Goals

After decades of teaching youth with disabilities in all grades and researching what youth with autism spectrum need to make better work adaptations, Dr. Jackie Marquette discovered what youth need to acquire employment. It is as simple as a two sided coin. One side is for employers to acknowledge a candidate’s skills, strengths, and support needs, and the other side of the coin involves preparing youth to see their skills and interests from a wide range of strengths, personalized supports, and gainful social emotional awareness. Jackie has an adult son with autism and she has walked the walk, with ups and downs, failures and successes. Trent had employment at Meijer, a retail store for 13 years with innovative supports and for 19 years Trent has created abstract paintings for his art business. Many youth fall short in getting employed or getting in the right workplace environment because of limited opportunities and experiences to prepare for personal/social awareness to self-advocate. Very few educators, counselors, and employment professionals understand why or how to prevent the high unemployment rate among youth.

LINKED IN

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

Dr. Jackie Marquette writes curriculum for student career preparation as it relates to skill development and social emotional learning. She is the  founder of the Transition Career Academy teaching online courses and face-to-face workshops. Her trainings are approved for 6 CE’s by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC). She has been endorsed by highly recognized colleagues in the disability field for skills in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Training, and Research. Her extensive experiences span teaching students with learning/developmental disabilities and ‘at risk’, spearheading autism community workplace projects, implementing school district transition programs, consulting and using her own tools, one-to-one with youth seeking employment through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. She researched and interviewed over 800 youth with autism and their advocates, professionals, family members. As the owner of Youth Rescue© DBA Marquette Index, LLC, her program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders, employers, and youth with their advocates. The purpose is to enhance everyone’s performance to make a meaningful difference in schools, companies, and the lives of all youth including those on who struggle socially and emotionally.

 

[COVID-19] Seven Empowering Actions We Can Give Teens

Hello Everybody

With the Stay at Home Order Youth need:

-a structure to do school work, exercise, leisure, and task(s) to contribute to the household.

-validation for any or all low emotions they feel: anxiety, anger, powerlessness.

-a game plan to recognize and name the full range of emotions they experience.

-an approach to feel and recognize the energy levels tied to activities/tasks.

-a plan to avoid letting low emotions take over and to know the steps to gain control.

-tools that will allow them to gain perspective over their emotions and have the emotions they want. [reframing]

-a process to see options and make daily decisions on their own behalf.

Many youth don’t know this question to ask: “How do I live in a world that is so different from what I knew before?” Youth need reassurance from us giving them hope for a good life and to believe in their own power to adapt to a world they are living in now.

The sooner youth have a grasp of their own power, the sooner they can shape their daily life and their goals. Here is my resource.

COVID-19 TEEN EMPOWERMENT [SEL]

To see additional resources for Distance Learning, go to:

‘Youth Rescue’ Teachers Pay Teachers’ Store

To Be Notified of New Promotions or Releases

Jackie’s website

I love creating tools to invite youth to experience:

*self-awareness to help direct their decisions, emotionally cope, and socially adapt.

*self-value to know they matter greatly.

*self-advocacy to express their voice and choice about what they need, what they enjoy, and who they want to become.

Thank you for reading my blog

LINKED IN

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

After decades of teaching youth with disabilities in all grades and researching what youth with autism spectrum need to make better work adaptations, Dr. Jackie Marquette discovered what youth need to acquire employment. It is as simple as a two sided coin. One side is for employers to acknowledge a candidate’s skills, strengths, and support needs, and the other side of the coin involves preparing youth to see their skills and interests from a wide range of strengths, personalized supports, and gainful social emotional awareness. Jackie has an adult son with autism and she has walked the walk, with ups and downs, failures and successes. Trent had employment at Meijer, a retail store for 13 years with innovative supports and for 19 years Trent has created abstract paintings for his art business. Many youth fall short in getting employed or getting in the right workplace environment. Rather, it is the personally matched opportunities and experiences with personal/social awareness preparation that enables adaptation and self-advocacy. With high youth unemployment, we all suffer. Very few educators, counselors, and employment professionals understand why or how to prevent the high youth unemployment rate.

 

Dr. Jackie Marquette writes curriculum for student career preparation as it relates to skill development and social emotional learning. She is the founder of the Transition Career Academy teaching online courses and face-to-face workshops. Her trainings are approved for 6 CE’s by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC). She has been endorsed by highly recognized colleagues in the disability field for skills in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Training, and Research. Her extensive experiences span teaching students with learning/developmental disabilities and ‘at risk’, spearheading autism community workplace projects, implementing school district transition programs, consulting and using her own tools, one-to-one with youth seeking employment through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. She researched and interviewed over 800 youth with autism and their advocates, professionals, family members. As the owner of Youth Rescue© DBA Marquette Index, LLC, her program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders, employers, and youth with their advocates. The purpose is to enhance everyone’s performance to make a meaningful difference in schools, companies, and the lives of all youth including those on who struggle socially and emotionally.

 

 

 

[FREE] Teen and Young Adult Bucket List: COVID-19

Hello Everyone,

Do you have a teen or young adult at home? Or do you have middle or high school students you are teaching online? They may be struggling with the COVID-19 crisis and having physical or emotional symptoms.

It becomes easy for teens to spend time glued to screens, playing video games and/or reading online about the disheartening behaviors of others. Fear is being spread everywhere across the media. If we allow it, any of us, including youth could sink into a deep despair. Or we could allow it to bring out the best in all of us during this historical time of COVID-19 crisis.

Here is a checklist to consider.

Does Your Teen Show any of These Signs?

____sleeping all day, staying up all night.
____shutting down, not talking to family members.
____eating unhealthy snacks
____staying closed up in the bedroom.
____taking in too much negative information.
____feeling “keyed up”
____feeling on edge
____irritability
____difficulty concentrating
____restlessness
____unexplained outbursts
____frequent headaches, including migraines
____digestive Problems
____excessive fatigue

These symptoms may be harmful to one’s physical and emotional health. Here are some approaches you can promote to either shape the rhythm of the day or restore physical or emotional health.

Be Proactive

1. Set Clear Expectations

This helps youth build a routine with rhythm to their day. Pay attention to the energy level that the activity provides.

2. Make time for exercise or movement (high physical energy)

3. Set aside time for reading or studying

(low physical energy), but mentally and emotionally taking in information

4. Structure time for creating,

(high inspirational or fun energy) such as, playing an instrument, writing a story, or doing artwork.

5) Spend time for leisure

(medium fun energy), spending quality time with family members playing cards or board games,

6) Offer time to contribute

(medium energy) seeing value to help the entire household, such as, washing dishes, taking part in making dinner, or mowing the lawn.

7) Allow Your Teen to Worry- avoid telling your teen to not worry.

Give your teen time with you each day to vent worries and brainstorm solutions together.

8) Practice Reframing

Set time aside to practice positive reframing to promote and empower your teen to act upon h-her anxious thoughts.

9) Empathize Often

Send the message to the teen h-she is being validated for their emotions and they are not alone.

These are just a few ideas. Think of your own and share your comments and ideas with me and others.

For more ideas, download:

Teen Bucket List – PDF2

To see additional resources for Distance Learning, go to:

‘Youth Rescue’ Teachers Pay Teachers’ Store

To Be Notified of New Promotions or Releases

Jackie’s website

I love creating tools to invite youth to experience:

*self-awareness to help direct their decisions, emotionally cope, and socially adapt.

*self-value to know they matter greatly.

*self-advocacy to express their voice and choice about what they need, what they enjoy, and who they want to become.

Thank you for reading my blog

LINKED IN

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

After decades of teaching youth with disabilities in all grades and researching what youth with autism spectrum need to make better work adaptations, Dr. Jackie Marquette discovered what youth need to acquire employment. It is as simple as a two sided coin. One side is for employers to acknowledge a candidate’s skills, strengths, and support needs, and the other side of the coin involves preparing youth to see their skills and interests from a wide range of strengths, personalized supports, and gainful social emotional awareness. Jackie has an adult son with autism and she has walked the walk, with ups and downs, failures and successes. Trent had employment at Meijer, a retail store for 13 years with innovative supports and for 19 years Trent has created abstract paintings for his art business. Many youth fall short in getting employed or getting in the right workplace environment. Rather, it is the personally matched opportunities and experiences with personal/social awareness preparation that enables adaptation and self-advocacy. With high youth unemployment, we all suffer. Very few educators, counselors, and employment professionals understand why or how to prevent the high youth unemployment rate.

Dr. Jackie Marquette writes curriculum for student career preparation as it relates to skill development and social emotional learning. She is the founder of the Transition Career Academy teaching online courses and face-to-face workshops. Her trainings are approved for 6 CE’s by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC). She has been endorsed by highly recognized colleagues in the disability field for skills in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Training, and Research. Her extensive experiences span teaching students with learning/developmental disabilities and ‘at risk’, spearheading autism community workplace projects, implementing school district transition programs, consulting and using her own tools, one-to-one with youth seeking employment through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. She researched and interviewed over 800 youth with autism and their advocates, professionals, family members. As the owner of Youth Rescue© DBA Marquette Index, LLC, her program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders, employers, and youth with their advocates. The purpose is to enhance everyone’s performance to make a meaningful difference in schools, companies, and the lives of all youth including those on who struggle socially and emotionally.

 

 

 

 

Youth Rescue [Coronavirus]: Creating Emotional and Physical Well-being

Hello Everybody,

These are uncertain times. As the world is in flux right now, people need specific things, good information, and creative ideas. One of the areas of need for youth is “online schooling” as schools around the globe have announced they’ll stay closed for 2 weeks to 2 months. There is no playbook on this global situation. We are creating our lives as we go. Our children’s life as they knew it has come to a halt. My adult son Trent has autism and his daily life of participating in the community has ended. I have had to create for him a new routine and structure at home.

Nine tips:

1. Assess what will be lost or changed in your home, i.e., working from home and/or financial income. Make a temporary plan to adapt the family to changes.

2. Involve your children  in creating an in-home structure with study time/reading, etc. Offer your teens and young adults resources, I offer two:New Resource: What to Do When…31 Activities for Self-advocacy: Real Teens, Real Situations  and my Fun Engaging Quiz about Your Strengths-FREE

3. Create routine leisure, household tasks, and outdoor exercise, i.e., riding a bike or walking in the park, etc. Having a little sunshine everyday helps. Everyone can contribute to advancing the emotional or physical safety in the family.

4. Be proactive in promoting self-care. Get a good night’s sleep, eat well, and make sure you wash your hands.” According to Dr. Mogel, in emergency preparation plans self-care lowers stress levels.

5. Carve out time for leisure, especially if you are a caregiver. Take soothing baths, walk outdoors, meditate, cook healthy nurturing meals, soups and stews.

6. Look for ways to appreciate the time you share with family members. These are sacred times.

7. If you have children, teens, or adults with who don’t do well with disrupted schedules, create in-home structures and schedules.

8. Your  emergency preparation plans include stocking up on groceries and toiletries, include the kids. When they choose their favorite snacks, it will help help them feel prepared.

9. Resources you might want to access: this pamphlet to help parents talk about coronavirus with their children and a group called Hermot, an international organization focusing on emotional preparedness for disasters.

In life before the Coronavirus, there was already a youth employment crisis. Youth need skills now! With the extra available time they have, why not encourage them to explore a career, make considerations and plans. Give them something to look forward to in their future. After the Coronavirus passes over, youth will be seeking training, education or work. Youth can use what they learned during this time.

I offer resources on the subjects of career planning, skill development, emotional and social learning, and future automation career options. Stay updated with Youth Rescue© program, my online school Transition and Career Academy, my resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, and online videos especially created for you and your teen or young adult. Check out these:  New Resource: What to Do When…31 Activities for Self-advocacy: Real Teens, Real Situations and my Fun Engaging Quiz about Your Strengths-FREE

To see additional resources for Distance Learning, go to:

‘Youth Rescue’ Teachers Pay Teachers’ Store

To Be Notified of New Promotions or Releases

Jackie’s website

I love creating tools to invite youth to experience:

*self-awareness to help direct their decisions, emotionally cope, and socially adapt.

*self-value to know they matter greatly.

*self-advocacy to express their voice and choice about what they need, what they enjoy, and who they want to become.

Thank you for reading my blog

LINKED IN

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

After decades of teaching youth with disabilities in all grades and researching what youth with autism spectrum need to make better work adaptations, Dr. Jackie Marquette discovered what youth need to acquire employment. It is as simple as a two sided coin. One side is for employers to acknowledge a candidate’s skills, strengths, and support needs, and the other side of the coin involves preparing youth to see their skills and interests from a wide range of strengths, personalized supports, and gainful social emotional awareness. Jackie has an adult son with autism and she has walked the walk, with ups and downs, failures and successes. Trent had employment at Meijer, a retail store for 13 years with innovative supports and for 19 years Trent has created abstract paintings for his art business. Many youth fall short in getting employed or getting in the right workplace environment. Rather, it is the personally matched opportunities and experiences with personal/social awareness preparation that enables adaptation and self-advocacy. With high youth unemployment, we all suffer. Very few educators, counselors, and employment professionals understand why or how to prevent the high youth unemployment rate.

Dr. Jackie Marquette writes curriculum for student career preparation as it relates to skill development and social emotional learning. She is the founder of the Transition Career Academy teaching online courses and face-to-face workshops. Her trainings are approved for 6 CE’s by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC). She has been endorsed by highly recognized colleagues in the disability field for skills in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Training, and Research. Her extensive experiences span teaching students with learning/developmental disabilities and ‘at risk’, spearheading autism community workplace projects, implementing school district transition programs, consulting and using her own tools, one-to-one with youth seeking employment through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. She researched and interviewed over 800 youth with autism and their advocates, professionals, family members. As the owner of Youth Rescue© DBA Marquette Index, LLC, her program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders, employers, and youth with their advocates. The purpose is to enhance everyone’s performance to make a meaningful difference in schools, companies, and the lives of all youth including those on who struggle socially and emotionally.

 

Career Readiness Starter Kit

Starter Kit includes:

The Strengths and Career Index +

 Power Practices Workbook: Explore Careers and Create Your Own Pathway

(meets common core standards in English Language Arts                

http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/1/)

 

 What’s Inside the Strengths and Career Index?

Click here to:

Get Students Their Personalized Employment Profile: Take the Strengths and Career Index.

Click to purchase membership:  $28.95’ 

Pay Only $10.00  Use discount code: Index65 

 

Endorsement [Book Review for Becoming Remarkably Able]

“Jackie Marquette Provides the guidance and the blueprint for helping professionals and parents move away from a deficit orientation to a celebration of abilities and strengths of persons with autism and related disabilities  By learning to energize the spirit of all persons, regardless of their challenges, we ultimately become more in touch with our humanity.”

Barry M. Prizant Ph.D. CCC. SLP, adjunct professor, Center for the Study for Human Development, Brown University; co-author of the SCERTS TM Model (Social Communication, Emotional Regulation, and Transactional Support)

POWER PRACTICES: STUDENT WORKBOOK

What’s Inside Student Workbook? 

Students will receive guided practice to: 

Explore their Career, Develop Self-awareness, and Self-Advocacy for on-the-job Success. 

BUY BOOK: 

https://amzn.to/2rcoKwl

 

Endorsement: [Book Review: Power Practices]

Dr. Marquette’s integration of mental health concerns, rigidities, social struggles and anxieties is both seamless and well though out and encourages  young students to see themselves more positively and to embrace all that they are and to see that they have important contributions to make in the world. I believe the Marquette Strengths Index and the Power Practices book should be introduced as part of school transition planning starting in early adolescence.”

Sheila Mansell, Ph.D. R. Psych

5 Things All Youth Leaving School Should Be Able to Say About their Work Readiness

Every young person leaving school wants to have a job or go to college.

Nationally we are in state of  youth employment crises. The situation is so complex, it isn’t just one variable. Yet one approach may give youth the leverage they need for employment, the personal and social capability training to adapt through adversity.

5 Things All Youth Leaving School Should Be Able to Say About their Work Readiness

1. I found it isn’t important to dwell on what I don’t have (my limitations) but to see what I  can do with what I have (exploring strengths, from an expansive approach).

2. I explored, reflected, and discovered my strengths for my best career options. I learned to see how certain careers are a good match to my strengths and interests.

3. I learned about my challenges and the tools I can use to keep me focused, on track, and adaptable to change.

4. Using Reflective Practice, I  took part in a group setting on how to face workplace adversity and discovered I always have options that I can choose for next steps in self-advocacy.

5. I learned about my own self-awareness and why self-awareness is important to getting hired,  to keeping a job, to adapt socially, to have safety and well-being, and to move toward future goals. 

Learning and practicing self-awareness and self-advocacy is not only important to the student, but this groundwork is also important to employers who want to recruit people with skills they need.

What Employers Want

Employers want to hire youth with skills in personal and social awareness to include empathy, ability to work with others, and integrity.

Employers want more support in getting young people “work-ready”.  Nearly nine in 10 employers feel that school leavers are not ready for work. They claim, youth often lack work experience in  communication and teamwork skills.  Employers express that youth don’t know how to behave professionally in a work environment. 

According to John Irons, managing director for global markets with the Rockefeller Foundation, employers are asking for assistance in recruitment, assessment, and support to address entry-level talent challenges and to improve employment outcomes for those facing barriers to workplace, such as diverse populations and disability

Give every student the leverage they need for employment success by offering self-awareness development and self-advocacy practice, so  the gap to the youth employment crises narrows.

Click here to get Your Starter Kit

What Gets Between Youth and Their Employment Potential?

After decades of teaching youth with learning disabilities and researching what youth with autism spectrum need to make better work adaptations, Dr. Jackie Marquette discovered what it takes to help youth rise to employment. The keys are guiding youth to see their skills and interests from a wide range of strengths, personalized supports,  training in social emotional awareness development, and plenty of experiences. These are the keys to all youth making adaptations. She has an adult son with autism and has walked the walk, with ups and downs, failure and successes. Trent had employment at Meijer, a retail store for 13 years with innovative supports and for 19 years Trent has created abstract paintings for his art business. Yet many youth with disabilities, autism spectrum, and youth from urban and rural areas fall short in getting employed because they lack opportunity to identify their skills and prepare for personal/social awareness and self-advocacy.  Very few educators, counselors and employment professionals understand why or how to prevent it.

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Dr. Jackie Marquette is the founder of the Transition Career Academy teaching online courses and face-to-face workshops. Her trainings are approved for 6 CE’s by CRCC. She has been endorsed by highly recognized colleagues in the disability field for skills in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Training, and Research. Her extensive experiences span teaching students with learning/developmental disabilities and ‘at risk’, spearheading autism community workplace projects, implementing school district transition programs, consulting and using her own tools, one-to-one with youth seeking employment through the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. She researched and interviewed over 800 youth with autism and their advocates, professionals, family members. As the CEO of S.A.F.E.T.Y. Works© DBA Marquette Index, LLC, her program is engineered to be a catalyst for leaders, employers, and youth with their advocates to enhance their performance to make a meaningful difference in schools, companies, and the lives of persons with Autism Spectrum/disabilities.

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