Connecting ASD Students to Career Options: 20 Tips You Don’t Want to Miss

Let’s start with a 4 question  self-questionnaire. You may  give it to a student or  your son/daughter . 

1. Do you know the career that is right for you?

___ Yes    ___Not Sure     ___No

2. Do you have a unique interest or ability, but don’t know the right course of study or career to pursue?

___ Yes    ___Not Sure     ___No

3. Can you name your personal preferences and emotional strengths?___ Yes    ___Not Sure     ___No

4. Do you have many strengths yet, have challenges such as, social anxiety?___ Yes    ___Not Sure     ___No

20 Career Tips Just for the Student and h/her advocate. I offer you these career tips to find career possibilities. No matter where you are in the process of seeking a career, try these tips to discover more about yourself and the career right for you.

1. Identify your hard skill strengths in cognitive interests. For example, you may enjoy watching a good debate, learn chunks of information quickly, or have an interest in reading and studying social issues, such as civil or gender rights. If any of these sound like you, discover how each of these can be applied to a career of interest. There are many outlets to pursue your strengths. Here is a video just for you.

2. Take note of your unique ways to self express. There are many ways to express your genius capacities. Some include music (singing, playing an instrument, writing music and lyrics), the arts (visual spatial talents to paint, sculpt, or in designing architecture). These strengths can lead to an idea for a business or self employment. Many people have extraordinary talents that fit into a careers and are highly valued in society. Doing what you love can still take work, yet, can be motivating, invigorating, and fun.

3. Personal Preference Strengths (PPS) are especially important to know, even if you have no idea of a career choice or if you already know a specific career interest. For example, you may have a preference to choose a setting that operates on a slower pace over a fast paced setting. PPS are enhancements that can positively support your motivation, participation, or performance in a career. Once understood how to apply your preferences, they offer you predictability and become the fabric of how you work, adapt, and become most effective. Your individual preferences can make all the significant difference to enjoying your job and maintaining a career. I call it ‘in the groove’. A person is most ‘in their groove’ or ‘in their own skin’ when understanding and using their personal preferences at their best. Being aware of your PPS is like having insight into knowing if the job atmosphere is right for you.

4. Your Emotional Strengths-

Emotions drive everything we do. Daniel Goleman claims our emotions are as important to managing a career as  cognitive skills. Having only hard skill ability will not guarantee your effectiveness in a career. It is important to know your best emotional strengths and how to use them to your benefit, such as, interviewing for a job, maintaining a career, or asking for a promotion.

Here are some emotional strengths that you may notice in yourself.  Emotional strengths are valuable to becoming a good employee.

5. Do you avoid letting other people’s opinions change yours? If you answered yes,  you are true to yourself and show a  sense of self-awareness? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No

6. Do you usually manage  well when you are in a group working on a task or a project? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No

If so, you have shown self-awareness.

7. Do you accept correction about how to do a task without reacting defensively? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No  If you answered yes, you show self- regulation.

8. Have you assisted another person when they asked for help on a task? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you are showing to be trustworthy.

9. When faced with an important task, do you get started working on it? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you are taking initiative.

10. Do you admit to yourself or someone else when you have made mistakes on a task? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you are showing that you are conscientious and trustworthy.

11. Have you came to a class or a meeting prepared?

___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you are showing that you are motivated.

12. Have you contributed ideas or work tasks with others on a project? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you have participated well on a team.

13. Have you thanked someone for doing you a favor, such as a teacher or a boss? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you are self-aware about when to show gratitude.

14. Have you helped someone who was struggling and needed assistance? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you were showing  empathy for someone else.

15. Have you found deep meaning and purpose in taking part of  a group, such as, bringing awareness about the global environment, or helping your church feed hungry families?

___ Yes ___Unsure ___No

If you answered yes, you are showing the ability to take part with focused group awareness.

16. Have you shown the unique ability to convince someone to buy something or do something beneficial? If you answered yes, you have shown to have influence with others.

17. Have you  sensed the moods of other people through their body language or facial expressions? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No                  If you answered yes, you have shown a deep social understanding in receptive communication and social awareness.

18. Are you a good listener to someone else you admire?

___ Yes ___Unsure ___No

If you answered yes, you have the ability to build a bond with others.

19. Have you participated with with others on a team or a project?

___ Yes ___Unsure ___No   If you answered yes, you were capable of cooperating and collaborating on a team.

20. Have you asked for help when you had a problem? ___ Yes ___Unsure ___No

If you answered yes, you have shown self-awareness.

Congratulate yourself if you discovered some ways you have self-awareness and social awareness.

Take the Strengths and Career Index   only $9.99.  Use code: Index65

Thank you for reading blog.

Dr. Jackie Marquette

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

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End Note:

I believe these tools have something unique to bring to the table for youth with ASD. This blog represents a strengths model to support personal preferences and emotional needs, known as SAFETY Works©.

In my research, I listened to the voices of hundreds individuals with autism and their advocate/parents about how they found meaning and how they wanted to live their lives. Over three decades of study and experience, I used the data to create these tools to help people facilitate getting the right job, pursue college, and/or to live interdependently. With personal experience, I have a an adult son with autism who has become an accomplished artist.  He taught me how to support his self-determination, self-advocacy and adaptation. We personally experienced many trials and errors with set backs and progress. My mission is to pass these tools to people with autism and their advocates to create and live their adult lives their own way.

Please offer your comments, because I want to hear them. I spend a lot of time writing. If you like my blog and think it can help other people, please share it.

Thank you for reading blog.

 

 

 

 

 

Blog: Twenty-five Effective Career Preparations that Promote Autism Spectrum Employment

Twenty-Five Effective Career Preparations that Promote Autism Spectrum Employment

Reprinted by permission from Different Brains.

Over the years, I’ve Learned

See Me–ASD & Unspoken Words:  

“Over the years, I’ve learned to ask for help with the things that I cannot do. Know I may need your support to connect me to people who can see me and guide me better than I can do by myself.

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Marquette Index, LLC.

Creator of the Marquette Strengths and Career Index 

Research | Consultant | Speaker | 4 time veteran of adult transition (39 year son with autism)

502 417-6063

drjackiemarquette@gmail.com

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

Connecting individuals to their strengths, careers, and well-being

It was a sweet thing

See Me: ASD & Unspoken Words

 “It was a sweet thing for my support- giver to see the best in me. They believed in me before I believed in me. So that gave me strength!  Thank you.”

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Use CODE: EPMAG50 for 50% discount.

Marquette Index, LLC.

Creator of the Marquette Strengths and Career Index

Research | Consultant | Speaker | 4 time veteran of adult transition (39 year son with autism)

502 417-6063

drjackiemarquette@gmail.com

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

Connecting individuals to their strengths, effectiveness, and well-being

 

I look at my son, and

Life, Work, and Well-Being

“I look at my son, and I see adaptation. But his individual challenges must be supported. So it is mix.”

Thank you.

Jackie

=====================================

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Use CODE: EPMAG50 for 50% discount.

Marquette Index, LLC.

Creator of the Marquette Strengths and Career Index

Research | Consultant | Speaker | 4 time veteran of adult transition (39 year son with autism)

502 417-6063

drjackiemarquette@gmail.com

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

Connecting individuals to their strengths, effectiveness, and well-being

Autism + Strengths = EFFECTIVENESS

Transition.001Today’s employment situation for individuals with autism is in a state of emergency. For a short time, I am offering for FREE my strengths tool to help individuals with autism facing transition. Do you know a student or an adult with autism seeking transition possibilities?

With this online tool, the individual or his teacher/parent advocate will identify strengths and receive vocational options that are in alignment with their strengths. These vocational possibilities are presented in a hierarchy of advanced studies, college/training, certification, high school diploma, self employment, volunteer, and hobbies. These are intended to meet the individual where he is.

Knowing and using one’s strengths are the the only way to be effective in a work setting. Having people around the individual who also knows  his strengths and supports for challenges, means everything! Strengths can set an individual apart from others in a very valuable way. The key is discovering the right path to use strengths in a positive way.

If interested, please send me the email of the individual or the person to be taking the assessment.  I will put the email in my web site, then contact you when you can take the assessment.

I am interested in those individuals who will provide feedback about their experience with the Marquette Strengths and Career Index.

End Note:

I believe I have something unique to bring to the table, a strengths model to support personal preferences and emotional needs, the Capability Approach (CA). Within the CA, I designed the Marquette Strengths and Career Index, a self assessment tool to offer career possibilities that closely match the individual’s identified strengths in hard skill interests, self expression (multiple intelligences), personal preferences, and emotional strengths.

I listened to the voices of hundreds individuals with autism and their advocate/parents about how they found meaning and how they wanted to live their lives. Over three decades of study, my own research, private practice as a consultant through Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, I designed specialized career and life tools to facilitate getting the right job, pursue college, and/or to live interdependently. Additionally, I have a 39 year old son with autism who is an accomplished artist.  I used these strategies to help him create work and have a life he has enjoyed with meaning and purpose. We personally experienced many trials and errors with set backs and progress. My mission is to help people with autism live their adult lives, revolutionizing culture. The purpose is to create a new culture, much different from the past, impacting persons with disabilities from childhood through older adulthood years.

Please offer your comments, because I want to hear them. I spend a lot of time writing. If you like my blog and think it can help other people, please share it.

Thank you for reading blog.

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Autism Consultant, Speaker, Author, and Trainer

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

(use discount code: Index50)

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

@JacqueMarquette

Why We Should Stop Promoting Independence: Autism and Disability

These two great women have influenced my perceptions about many things, including the concept of ‘independence’ surrounding individuals with disabilities.

Independence is bad.001“The myth of the lone individual is a trope, a rhetorical device. In real life no one is self-made; few are truly alone.” Linda Kerber

“We are an Interdependent People. Dependence is not bad–indeed, it is at the heart of both the human and the American experience. It is what makes a community and a democracy.” K. E. Nielson

This is clearly evident. In my qualifying data from my research, private practice, and case studies, many of the individuals were quite dependent upon guidance. Mostly they relied upon support by those who saw in them their brilliance and then helped them move toward their dreams and their goals, if simply to enjoy life and be known or participate as a community member.

I welcome comments.

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Consultant, Speaker, & Author

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

(use discount code: Index50)

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

@JacqueMarquette

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

Three Harmful Words We Should Stop Using About Individuals with Autism

Many of us are in roles of providing caregiving, daily living support, community assistance, on-the-job training, or teaching in educational settings to individuals with autism or disabilities. I found three words that are harmful that we should stop using. We often use these words when describing the individual to other people involved, such as, when talking about their challenges, or making decisions about how to include an individual with autism.

We don’t intend harm, but when we use these words they have negative connotations and we represent the individual in less than desired ways. I believe these words have subtle power that may cause additional obstacles to their inclusion and acceptance. The words are:

1). behavior,

2). manipulation, and

3). OCD (obsessive compulsive disorders).

Behavior – I suggest that we replace the word ‘behavior’ with ‘response’. The individual is responding and communicating at the same time. Although both words are similar, ‘behavior’ implies the individual is the source of their problems. Rather ‘response’ is a softer word that suggests there is something she is trying to communicate about herself that is important. She needs to know and feel we hear her and acknowledge her responses.

Manipulate -We should stop using the word ‘manipulate’ because it suggests the individual is intentionally out to cause trouble or turmoil. We should start seeing the individual’s action as a way for her to ‘to cope’ with something that may be causing a personal struggle within. We could choose to see her seeking some input or having a voice about a personal need or desire. This is known as personal determination. With this perspective, we become more open to identify hidden fears or anxiety that is at the root of ‘manipulation’.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) –We should stop  using ‘OCD’ when explaining to someone about the individual’s response (behavior). ‘OCD’ presents a  condescending meaning when describing an applicant to a new manager in a work setting for example. It implies the individual is the cause of his problem and diagnoses. Instead we should use words that show dignity and respect for the individual such as, “She is  ‘precise’ or ‘detailed’ about her work.”

In summary, when the individual becomes frustrated or angry unexpectedly, her response may appear outlandish and disruptive to us. Her actions may be in response to a situation that didn’t unfold and one she was counting on to bring her pleasure or other higher emotions: contentment, joy involvement in the activity, or spending time with someone she relied upon in certain settings. As a result, when she tried to cope with the negative unexpected change, such as an unfamiliar rude person in the setting or anxiety on the job or a community setting, it may have brought about feelings of losing control, helplessness, or fear of uncertainty. Many individuals with autism have these emotional reactions to negative abrupt change.

In contrast, when the individual feels understood and heard by people in the setting, this changes everything for the positive. Thus, we have changed the setting into an opportunity for positive emotional responses and enhanced adaptation. This is called empathy.

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Consultant, Speaker, & Author

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

(use discount code: Index50)

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

@JacqueMarquette

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

 

The Antidote to Ableism

Recently, I advocated for one of my clients who has autism. In this blog I withhold any names of people or settings to not reveal this individual’s identity.

Today we experienced a closed door that ended his place there for the last 3 years. This was confusing because he always enjoyed it there and felt accepted. ‘Ableism’ is dark and ugly and still lingers casting its harsh sting on  individuals with disabilities and their advocates. No matter how many times I experience it, it knocks me down. Yet, I have learned to get up and not let it overcome me.

Later in this same day, pursuing a different opportunity, we met with the management who was open, accepting, willing to work with the individual, and promised they would not give up on him. ‘Acceptance’ shined its glory light.

I will never take for granted ‘acceptance’, what it feels like and the  promises it holds for individuals with autism.

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Consultant, Speaker, & Author

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

(use discount code: Index50)

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

@JacqueMarquette

Today at 1- I will be a guest on Dr Andy McCabe’s radio talk show.

andrew_mccabeToday at 1 I will be a guest on Dr Andy McCabe’s radio talk show. http://www.healthylife.net/RadioShow/archiveADA.htm

I will talk about creating individualized career options for those who don’t fit within the typical boxes of finding and having work. Points include:

How to identify what you are good at doing and what draws your attention.

Two added important areas that are often avoided have relevance to getting and keeping work. I will be talking about these too.

The individuals who might be interested in this discussion:

-are interested in knowing their strengths and possible career paths.

-are unclear about a career path.

-lack confidence.

-struggle with social anxiety.

-feel they don’t fit into a logical progression of study for a career, but have specific talent to develop and use.

-view themselves in a category of Neurodiversity or High Functioning or a diagnosed disability.

-has an Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

-is in Other Health Impairments (OHI) category.

 

Dr. Jackie Marquette

Consultant, Speaker, & Author

www.marquettestrengthsindex.com

(use discount code: Index50)

To receive daily posts and live chats visit: https://www.facebook.com/MarquetteStrengthIndex/

@JacqueMarquette